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Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
care law was so unpopular when the president signed it into law and it remains absolutely that two years later. apparently nancy pelosi was right about the obamacare program, at least when she uttered these now infamous words, calling for passage of the legislation. >> we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it. away from the father of the controversy. lou: is getting rid of obamacare so one option for republicans? we will talk with legal analyst peter johnson on the way forward. also, the worsening political crisis in egypt. splitting egypt between those who want the islamic state, governed by sharia law, and those who oppose it. andrew boston this year. the professor and the author of the new book "sharia versus freedom." in the nation's credit rating is at risk. serious proposals to reduce the deficit and really end our national debt. potentially, a significant blow to the obamacare controversial o contraceptive mandate. the eighth circuit court of appeals in the preliminary injunction to stop the mandate for being enforced against the missouri catholic busi
of a new law in russia that bars american citizens from adopting russian children. president vladimir putin has signed the law, which places new strains on bilateral relations. >> the new law comes in response to american legislation that withholds visas to russians accused of human rights violations and freezes their u.s. assets. >> most bills signed by president putin have not been subjected to so much public scrutiny, but the ban on americans adopting russian children is controversial, so putin's strategy is to appeal to russian patriotism. >> as far as i know from opinion polls, the vast majority of russian citizens have a negative opinion of foreigners adopting our children. russia can and must look after its own children. >> at the same time, a russian judge acquitted a former prison doctor. human rights activists say he is responsible for the death of a russian lawyer in 2009. the lawyer was imprisoned after accusing russian officials of the $230 million tax fraud. since his death, relations beween the u.s. and russia have increasingly soured, culminating in the adoption van --over 7
you my standard is this -- you can't legislate morality. legislation works on the sane, the law abiding. it doesn't work on criminals -- >> if it's possible to reduce the loss of life, you're up for trying it? >> there are monsters out there every day and we need to do something to stop them. >> if it's possible to reduce the loss of life, you're worth trying it, correct? >> i want it. that's what i'm proposing. >> let's stipulate you're right. let's say armed guards might work. let's widen the argument a little bit. here is a magazine for ammunition that carries 30 bullets. isn't it possible that if we got rid of these, if we replaced them and said can you only have a magazine that carries five bullets or ten bullets, isn't it just possible we could reduce the carnage in a situation like -- >> i don't believe that's going to make one difference. there are so many ways to evade that. you had that for ten years when dianne feinstein passed that ban in '94, it was on the books. columbine occurred right in the middle of it. it didn't make any difference. i know everyone -- this tow
problems with mexico's strict laws on gun ownership. he was held for attempting to bring a family hair -- heirloom across the border even though he tried to declare. it and there will be a referendum on a new constitution. the muslim brotherhood says the islamist-backed constitution passed with a 64% yes vote. the official results from the last round of voting are expected to be announced tomorrow. former south carolina governor mark sanford is confirming reports that he might run for his old house seat. the one-time rising gop star stepped down as governor two years ago after admitting an affair. his ex-wife jenni sanford is also weighing running for the same house seat. and happy birthday to kolo, the first gorilla born in captivity and the oldest gorilla living in any zoo. she turned 56 and celebrated with a party at the columbus zoo in ohio. we should also wish our regular anchor a happy birthday. she is off for the holiday. there is a picture of her with her presents. >> and shannon is celebrating her 21st birthday. >> that's right. she can finally go and have a beer. >>> as capit
families who signed up to adopt. this new law was named after a russian baby that died in the custody of his american adoptive parents. he was neglected. but it is really believe that the reason for this law was another law that was just passed in washington, so it is a response to the american law punishes human rights violators in russia. it was sparked by the death of a russian lawyer who died died in jail investigating a fraud case at the request of americans in russia. it singles out dozens of russians that police believe are connected to that case. they can't travel to the united states and their assets are frozen. russia has been defiant in this case. it is even launching a posthumous price for the new law and russian voices speaking of saying it's not fair to penalize children. having adopted 60,000 over last two decades, and as you mentioned, there are several dozen cases right now that are pending. several dozen russian children who are in the final stages of this adoption process. those who should be coming to the united states very soon. it is not clear what's going to hap
care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing
the conflicting answers. plus, 2013 will be a pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference.
ban better, any more effective? >> you want one more law on top of 20,000 laws. most of the federal gun laws we don't even adhere to. >> the other big story in washington, nine days until the fiscal cliff and no deal in sight with the president and congress home for the holidays, today key senators from both sides weigh in on the prospects of ayn greem before new year's. >> you know, if you look at the final positions last monday of both the president and speaker boehner, they were this close. they were this close to a solution. >> if he were to say and the president were to say we're going to pass a bill, with a majority of democrats and majority of republicans in the house and senate, we could get a mainstream bill. >> if you want leaders, you have to lead. the president's been a pathetic fiscal leader. he's produced three budgets and can't get one vote for any of them. boehner will be tip o'neill, obama needs to be reagan. i would vote for revenues including tax rate hikes, even though i don't like them, to stave country from becoming greece. >> today, despite the president being
. >> nancy, you went to harvard law school. you went to oxford. you could have done so many things. how did you end up at the white house? >> i could have done many things and i have done many things. i started off as a lawyer. i am from a small town. my mom raised three kids on her own. she did not have a college education, but she is viewed in me that i could have one. >> how did she do that? >> she had very high expectations and let me know that she wanted me to do very well in school. when i would talk to her about one in to work in the white house sunday or being interested in politics, she would say you have to study hard and get good grades because you will need a scholarship. i cannot afford it, but she never said i could not do it. that was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i went to law school. in the early 1980's, when i got out of law school and was going around to law firms, even at that point, there were not many women in law firms. people would sit me down and say, do you understand that if we take you into this law firm, you will have to try cases? [laughter] t
is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed two weeks ago. that law puts financial restrictions on russians accused of human rights violations, bans them from also traveling to the united states. i want to bring in our matthew chance from london. and matthew, of course, you were a correspondent in moscow for a very long time here. it seems at least there's a split. you've got russia's foreign minister who actually criticized putin before he signed this ban. so what is going on here? is this a power play? and is this something that is actually going to take effect? >> i mean, you're right. there has been a very rare split in the russian political elite about this issue. there's been some criticism that was leaked to the press in russia about how some officials including the foreign minister concerned about what the impact this may have. also an opposition newspaper in russia has issued a petition, saying the law should not been enacted. that's had more than 100,000 signatures. obviously, it's something that divides russian society. but make no mistake, it is a power
to this crisis. we're talking about the fiscal cliff. >> it hasn't got ensigned into law. there's no success yet there. >> boehner should move it tomorrow. he should just do that. >> jonathan? >> listen, the president campaigned on a three to one spending reduction and we're not see anything spending here. democrats controlled two-thirds of the chips. >> joy ann, why is this all about taxes? >> one reelection and the -- it doesn't do that much spending. >> it's been all about taxes. >> all about raising taxes. >> there's this obsession with raising taxes. >> it was to go after school lunches and elderly care, health care for poor kids and increased spending. >> no, no, no, they want entitlement reform, joy ann. why this obsession with cutting old people's medicare? >> it's not an obsession about cutting benefits to the elderly, joy ann. it's about reforming medicare over time so at some point in the future we don't tell an 80-year-old you know what? you're not going get the medicare cha you thought you would have. this is about not hurting the elderly. >> the republican solution is to hand 80-ye
do is break our immigration laws there are going to be shabsolutely no consequences aen drain our tax dollars and no enforcement. >> reporter: record number of deportationin deportationings, 410,000 in all and over half committed felonies or misdemeanor, suggesting they're the priority. >> harris: dominic, kind of bottom line it for us. what do the changes tell us about the obama administration immigration polyat this point? >> if you listen to the immigration hawks, they say it's further evidence that the president isn't serious about immigration. in his defense, the president publicly said that immigration law is broke and and while pro immigration activists welcome the change, claiming current legislation is too aggressive. the american civil liberties union today says that reforms still don't go far enough. and a statement from them reading this, the reforms do nothing to address this most basic constitutional problem that has led to the needless unlawful detention of both u.s. citizens aen noncitizens alike, and whether you agree with the new policy or not, harris, the white hou
year's to be signed into law. today is the 27. and so you have a few days left for lawmakers to make a deal. the president's should land at some point. there is a 5 hour time difference. they have to figure out something. it seems likely will go over the cliff. it has been looking like that before the holiday, but certainly now, particularly if you remember for congress broke for the christmas break, speaker raynor was not able to get the backup plan through his caucus, so there was no pressure on democrats to try to counter that immediately. senate democrats saying we passed a bill that raises tax rates on incomes over $250,000, we ran on this and this is what we are offering. house republicans were saying, no, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. someone is going to have to move. the question is, who? the president met with senate majority leader harry reid before going to hawaii and his offer was to extend the tax cuts for incomes under $250,000, extend unemployment insurance benefits, and the lady across -- and then delay the across the board automati
to the people of cuba. the helms-burton law was not as effective as i would have liked. >> another issue out you are associated with is autism. how did that get started? >> my grandson was a very normal child. when he was 18 months to two years old, he got nine shots in one day. seven of which had thimerosol, mercury. it is a preservative. in 1929 it was tested on the 29 people who had meningitis. they said that the mercury had no impact so they started using solutions.halmologic when children get a few vaccinations, it did not have a huge impact but they started to get as many as 25 or 30 before they get to the first grade. my grandson got nine in one day and he became artistic, banging his head against the wall. then diary and constipation -- diarrhea and constipation. he was doing terrible. i was not aware of autism and all but i was chairman of the committee that did the investigation so i started to looking into with health and human services and the food and drug administration and that is where i had four years of hearings on that and i became convinced that women -- that mercury, women w
to compromise. >> senator lindsey graham was "meet the press this morning. >> we are one law away from solving this problem. this problem runs deep and wide. i live in south carolina and chuck lives in new york. i understand how he was brought up. maybe he tries to understand how i was rabrought up. people where i live i have been christmas shopping have been coming up to me, please don't let the government take my guns away. >> how realistic do you think that is? >> chuck is my boss. anything chuck says absolutely 100%. >> who said there wasn't politics on the show today? >> it's a rhetorical question because president obama himself has mentioned on the streets of chicago you need one set of gun rules and in wyoming maybe it is something else. i think we have seen that kind of regionalization of laws. connecticut had an assault weapons ban that didn't prevent this tragedy from happening and didn't outlaw the kind of gun you would want to be outlawed for that kind of tragedy. i don't know that the federal government will be able to slice and dice. it will be very difficult and very close if th
how the two connect. well, this is my mother-in-law, and she was as old as the year, so she was 24 in 1924, when she was married. and i have a feeling that perhaps this was a special wedding present from her husband. i just wonder. it isn't the sort of thing parents would give. oh, no. far too-- far too flippant i would have thought for a parent. but, um, for a husband maybe. it might have been a wedding present. now, let's just have a look here, because i can see on a lot of the pots and the devices and the buffer and so on there's the initial "n." "n." she was nell. wonderful. her name was ellen but she was known as nell. and the hallmarks... well, they're different. i can see their different. they're very tiny. not easy to see. i can see they date from about 1926 through to about 1929. oh, so-- so it couldn't have been a wedding present, so, not a wedding present, but maybe an anniversary present or the birth-of- a-child present. but tell me a little bit about nell. i mean, it's lovely to hear a daughter-in-law saying that she was a lovely mother-in-law.
they want to bill, the infrastructure, the programs they make into law. guest: i think james hits on the virtue of a flat tax, having a low, single rate, getting rid of all the loopholes in the tax code and having the government learn to live within its means. that would take some time, but it is eminently doable with positive reforms on the entitlement for younger people. you do not have to change the benefit formulas for those on medicare or social security or who are about to go on those systems. as younger people know, those systems are headed for a crash. the sooner we reform them in a positive way, the better. the key to do it is not by raising taxes, but by having a low single rate and they learn to live within it. i think you'll have a much more prosperous country for it. host: let's end where we started. what do you think the best solution in your personal view and your business view is to the fiscal cliff situation? guest: aside from not doing something foolish and the next three or four days -- that is why i do not mind kicking the can down the road -- would be to follo
shooting in american history. does the tragedy in connecticut mean the country needs new gun laws? we'll have a fair & balanced look next. so, this board gives me rates for progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. jamie: this just in. the u.s. marine veteran who spent four months behind bars in one of mexico most violent prisons is now home. this is my favorite christmas story because jon hammar was jailed in deplorable conditions on a questionable gun charge in mexico. he was taken to a u.s. hospital with flu-like symptoms. just arriving back at his family's home in florida. that is where steve harrigan is live in palmetto bay, florida. steve, what a christmas gift for this family. >> reporter: jamie, it was rashable to see here, four or five minutes ago
. >> with that perspective, now that the affordable care act will begin to become fully finalized into law over the next couple years, we keep hearing those on the conservative side is concerns about what it will do to the country. what are your concerns? will this be a good thing? >> yes, it will. right now, we have $50 billion a year of uncompensated care. people who do not have insurance, do not have medicaid, medicare, private insurance, mode carry coverage, they are not insured. they have access to health care in emergency rooms and if they cannot pay, and they do not go to bankruptcy, it costs -- the care does not go away. it is shifted to the rest of us who do have insurance. $50 billion. it could be as much as $1,500 per person. paying for those who do not. you have everybody in the system all injured one way or another, then the uncompensated care goes away. it is no longer borne by those of us who are beneficiaries of an insurance program. that alone is a hidden tax people do not focus on unless it is pointed out to them. it raises the cost to everyone else. the fact never gets talked about. s
's rape laws and efforts to expedite trials. meanwhile, police moved to quell a rally by about 500 students protesting the treatment of women as they moved toward a monument in new delhi. the students complained officials had declared the site off limits. >> ( translated ): we are taking out this peaceful protest. we don't have any conflict with the police. we have just come here to express our stand. all the students are expressing their opinions here as you can see so the police should allow all of us to pass through to the place. this is only our demand and nothing else. >> holman: the rape that ignited the protests was that of a 23- year-old woman attacked by six men, then thrown from a moving bus. overnight, she arrived in singapore via air ambulance for treatment of severe internal injuries. doctors described her condition as extremely critical. the top prosecutor in egypt has ordered an investigation of major opposition leaders for allegedly inciting revolt. an official in the prosecutor's office said today the probe will focus on nobel peace laureate mohammed el-baradei, f
% of the boat. the government agrees -- there's a lot, under greek law whatever party comes in first, take a step back, greece has proportional representation that deserves a word of comment. proportional representation is the peculiar idea that if you get a certain percentage of the vote in an election, you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that right the laws. it you didn't do that you exclude the 18% that had a role to play in governing which you think is the idea. in european countries we have proportional representation. if you get more than usually a cut off of 5% to get whatever the percentage of your vote is that is how many seats you get. you all understand i assume we don't do that in united states. if you get 51% of the vote you get it all and 49% wage. we have had proportional representation in the united states in the past. when you read about primary, and they a gets 20 delegates for the convention and candidate b, that is proportional, they get an equal number of delegates, we actually recognized in the united states proportional representation, we jus
. jefferson himself said that the duty of a magistrate is to the line of the law, but it is not the highest duty. that the survival and success of the country is your highest obligation. one person's imperial president i is another person's hero. one person's tyranny is another person's brilliant reform. part of what we have to struggle with from age to age in america is realizing that some generations there's going to be an excess of power useed in a way -- used in a way in which we approve, and in some generations there's going to be an excess of power used in ways which we would fight to the death against. but that's the way history has unfolded. and jefferson was on the right side of that in the very beginning. i want to talk about three quick lessons that i think all of us can, particularly our second term, early second term president might be able to take from jefferson. one goes to louisiana which is you need to be daring. jefferson understood that the political clock wasn't like a normal clock, it moved faster. ing as the president's clock ticks even in a first term, everybody else
into law. if you're among republicans is if you reach an agreement now and agree to tax increases, the spending cuts will get undone or never will be followed through on. that's one of the things that has held back talks, because republicans are skeptical that democrats will follow through. host: charles is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course.
't stop until there's common sense gun poll laws at the federal and state level. >> there's an equation that goes in to this and talking about gun regulation as being a punlg factor in all of it, everyone from the left and right brought up whether there's other contributing factors. one senator was on this morning seeming willing to put all of these options on the table, but specifically, when it comes to talking beyond gun regulation. take a listen. >> we have to do everything we have. it will include looking at how many bullets do you need in a magazine in a semiautomatic weapon. and we need to talk about xbox 360 and wii and those games and how far down in this to children they're getting. we need to talk about movies and we need to talk about the rating systems. >> does she have a point, shannon? >> absolutely. we live in a very, very violent society. so the answer to that is not to increase the guns we all have. i think there's some distraction of the issue by the nra and they want us to look at other things and we should but that doesn't mean to take our focus off of the issue of
was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cases? >> [laughter] >> i said that is what i wanted to do and was excited about it. i have clients in the beginning, i would go in to meet them. afterwards, one of my partners would say that they say that was not what i expected. he did not know there was going to be a lady lawyer on this case. but i really liked trying cases. it was a lot of fun. then i was drawn into politics. throughout my career, i have been interested in how to change things for the better. i have been very fortunate to have lots of opportunities to serve. >> you mentioned your mother. your mother died of lung cancer. she was such a force in your life. >> i think it made me very strong because it was very clear i had no one to depend on but me. >> 3 the o
they cannot afford to repay. the national consumer law attorney took part in the discussion examining student loan debt and its effects on both the student and the parents. this is about an hour and 20 minutes. >> with a degree come student debt. i'm really happy to be here tonight. it is great to take some time, to have this many and this whole set up to discuss these things, and these issues. i think propublica does a fantastic job with this, as they do with everything. we are happy to have a fantastic panel with the array of experts you would want to be discussing this issue. marion has been covering this for propublica, and a month ago had a fantastic piece that would-be the result of months of investigation of the debt burden on parents. that is an aspect that not a lot of people have been talking about. although you may have read about it on the cover of the "new york times" today, a month ago is when she began talking about it. we have the publisher and author of a best seller called "secrets to winning a scholarship." next to him, an attorney with the national consumer law center and
you are a republican from georgia or a liberal democrat from manhattan, as soon as a law like that gets passed, people become creative in finding ways to qualify. out of the woodwork, all the folks that would qualify. at the end of the david acton & social security age for everybody was truly disabled and let the market take care of its. people in stress occupations for many years now have been leaving those stress occupations well old age of 65 to go into some other line of work. a good example is people that install floors. it's tough in your knees. you see very few people doing that passed the age of 40. they find other work in the construction sector. baseball players have saw money, they don't have to work when they are done. host: let's hear from paul, a republican, in indiana. caller: how are you? there's a competing network of button tot has a access "rise above." if i had a button, it would say stop wasteful spending. how much money we would save if we stop wasteful spending. guest: we could also find our sunny and obscure and ridiculous government spending programs.
before the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff, law marriages are pointing fingers and playing the blame game. >> mario monti is saying he's available to lead italy, but only for a party willing to push his economic agenda. >> but he has competition in the form of sylvia berlusconi, italy's former prime minister tells cnbc he feels a responsibility to run. >> translator: i feel the need to return to the political arena to prevent the country from being delivered into the hands of a leftist party. >> and the crowds are out, the stores are ringing up those sales. but u.s. shoppers, they may be running lower on holiday spirit and analysts are saying that they're spending less, as well. >>> if you're just tuning in, thank you so much for joining us on the show here. a bit of a pre-christmas special for you. these are how the markets are looking at the u.s. open. still looking very negative. we had a high volume session on friday where the markets pulled back about 1% across the board. the markets are still in positive tear over to. but nonetheless, the negative sentiment around the
with them for the next job. we need to abolish laws, turn everything around and encourage affordable insurance. >> host: what is the argument in favor of having it divided by states? >> guest: i can't think of any argument i find persuasive. you want to buy insurance across state lines. so this is just silliness. the only people to benefit our special interest to pack into your health insurance plan, their special coverage is and that's not benefiting here. it's benefiting special interests. >> host: "priceless: curing the healthcare crisis," the new book in 2012 and john goodman is the author. this is booktv on c-span 2. >> they are just necessary to restore economic health. president george w. bush who wrote the forward to the book makes opening remarks. this is about 45 minutes. [cheers and applause] >> thank you all for coming. so when we have an event like this a year from now, as nice as harlan's operation is, i think would be a place you really like on the smu campus. thank you for your house italic t. it's a pretty good interim step. i want to thank a soldier turner at smu, p
at the point where in just four days every american's tax rates are scheduled to go up by law. every american's paycheck will get consider bring smaller. and that would be the wrong thing to do for our economy. it would be bad for middle class families and it would be bad for businesses that spend, depend on family spending. fortunately congress can prevent it from happening if they act right now. i just had a good and constructive discussion here at the white house with senate and house leadership about how to prevent this tax hike on the middle class. and i'm optimistic we may still be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses in time. senators reid and mcconnell are working on such an agreement as we speak. but, if an agreement isn't reached in time between senator reid and senator mcconnell, then i will urge senator reid to bring to the floor a basic package for an up-or-down vote, one that protects the middle class from an income tax hike, extends the vital lifeline of unemployment insurance to 2 million americans looking for a job, and lays the groundwork for future cooperati
was a veteran of u.s. military service. he also worked in many law enforcement positions. we're told. and he was in afghanistan, working for the contractor company dime corp. international, a major u.s. contractor in the war zone, working to help mentor and train afghan police forces. this is the latest of the so-called insider attacked that have plagued the forces over the past year. many active duty forces killed, contract contractors. 50 deaths this year. they haven't been able to get a handle on it. hala? >> and these attacks have been increasing. what is the reason behind the increase in attacks. >> this is -- they have increased throughout the year, but over the course of the year, ebbed and flowed, thankfully where there hasn't been one in several weeks. the military, the intelligence effort in the military has been to try to figure out the answer to that very question. what is going on. why is this happening? some of them are said to be taliban infiltrations. but there is a sense we're told that many of them are due, how to describe it, to cultural differences. afghans who feel a gru
'll see estate taxes go up, investment taxes go up. there is an endless list of expiring provisions of law that will, in fact, expire if nothing is done. and i think even if something is done at this point, what you're looking at is something very scaled back, something very small and congress will have to come back next year and take a look at trying to get to some of those other issues. >> alistair here. that sounds about right to me, assuming that that scenario is how things play out. what sort of impact medium term do you think this is going to have on consumer and corporate confidence in america, given that the fiscal cliff is clearly weighed heavily on both of those in recent months? >> the sad thing, you know, from an observer's standpoint here is that there isn't much corporate or consumer confidence in the american government. and it's proved itself dysfunctional time and again over the last couple of years. what you hear now is not how people believe that there's going to be some last-minute deal, but how they remember the times that the t.a.r.p. bill, the fiscal bailout a few ye
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)

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